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Infertile couples are often very confused when they go to IVF doctors , because they get so many different opinions , and they're not sure whom they can trust.

There are multiple reasons for why IVF doctors will often give widely varying opinions.

For one thing, a lot of our technology is still not perfect, which means we cannot make an accurate diagnosis in reproductive medicine. This is why two different doctors will interpret the same test result in diametrically opposite ways !

Also, we need to remember that making babies involves a couple, which means the fertility of a couple will be the sum of the fertility potential of both the partners . This is why answers are never in black or white - they are always shades of grey ! It's possible that if an "infertile man" marries a very fertile woman, he will be able to get pregnant.

Also, time plays a key role is the final outcome . Trying time - the time for which an infertile couple has been trying to get pregnant is a very important dynamic variable, which means the way we treat a recently married couple is very different from the way we treat one who has been trying for more than one year - even of their test results are identical !

The problem is that the natural history of fertility is difficult to interpret, because we all know infertile couples who haven't been able to have a baby in the bedroom for five years, who still get pregnant on their own, for no clear reason. Of course, if they got pregnant after the doctor's "treatment", he is going to take all the credit. These anecdotal success stories bias the doctor, and his individual personal preferences are going to influence what he advises his patient. Some doctors are aggressive and will advise IVF for everyone, whereas others are much more conservative - and patients need to recognize this difference !


What to find an IVF clinic which respects your time and intelligence ?






Source : https://blog.drmalpani.com/2020/02/why-ivf-doctors-disagree.html
Authored by : Dr Aniruddha Malpani, MD and reviewed by Dr Anjali Malpani.
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